Non residential construction market in central europe

France has the poorest forecast 0.

european construction sector observatory

Meanwhile, Slovenia has seen a steady increase in its construction output growth with an 8. A similar strong increase is forecasted for Ireland, even if the trend is decelerating within the forecast period. The leading market in the next three year period will be infrastructure.

Even Denmark, the country most affected by the financial crisis, is in a position to experience growth in its construction market.

European construction sector observatory poland

Meanwhile, Slovenia has seen a steady increase in its construction output growth with an 8. In the eastern European CEE-4 countries growth is rapid. Growth will continue in and , but at a slower rate, and construction will no longer be the European engine of growth. In particular, Spanish companies whose businesses relate to infrastructure have been keen to secure projects abroad. Economic growth is expected to remain solid, unemployment will decrease, exports will grow, interest rates will remain low and the confidence of consumers and business and industry in the future is high. This is the fifth consecutive year of growth. However, differences in political and economic development mean it is difficult to generalise further. This overall growth is based on a strong expansion in civil engineering and non-residential segments where a much-improved economic situation in Slovenia has resulted in more public financing available for new construction projects. Particularly well performing sectors include hotel construction, education and health and certain civil engineering sub-sectors, especially railways. Even Denmark, the country most affected by the financial crisis, is in a position to experience growth in its construction market. Google Plus The Eastern European Construction Forecasting Association EECFA — the forecasting association conducting research on the construction markets of eight central and eastern European countries — has released its Summer Construction Forecast Reports, which looks at the period up to The macroeconomic environment is increasingly favourable and the levels of FDI have also topped record levels. A similar phenomenon has occurred in the U. The expected average growth is 7.

Commercial real estate so far has posted slightly lower growth rates, similarly to the overall economy of Ukraine. The latter is the best performing one among the big five countries. Growth will stop in the next few years in Finland, Germany and Sweden.

Non residential construction market in central europe

Commercial real estate so far has posted slightly lower growth rates, similarly to the overall economy of Ukraine. Further, past market performance in the Scandinavian region contributes to a solid foundation for future growth. As growth is expected to continue also in and , the sector is in for a seven-year growth streak. Growth will continue in and , but at a slower rate, and construction will no longer be the European engine of growth. UTC ,0,1. The latter is the best performing one among the big five countries. We think these markets are far from overheating, however. Particularly well performing sectors include hotel construction, education and health and certain civil engineering sub-sectors, especially railways. Even Denmark, the country most affected by the financial crisis, is in a position to experience growth in its construction market. Nevertheless, total construction output in increased and summed up to a total volume of 1, billion Euro in the Euroconstruct region. The expected average growth is 7. Great differences in regional and country-specific outlook In and the next two years construction growth will be fastest in Hungary, Poland, Ireland and Portugal: nearly 12 per cent p.

However, differences in political and economic development mean it is difficult to generalise further. In and it was about 5 per cent while the European figures stood at 2.

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